Peru Travel Guide

Peru is hands down in my top three favorite countries in the world to travel around. It has rolling sand dunes, lake life, vast canyons, lush rainforests, sprawling city life, massive mountains, rich history, famous cuisine, unique wildlife, warm people, beaches and surf and the list goes on. It truly does have it all.  They also grow avocados and quinoa so they’re both extremely cheap and abundant. Eat up and strap in for your Peruvian adventure. It’s unmissable and unforgettable. 

Photo by Jean Vella on Unsplash

Photo by Jean Vella on Unsplash

Things to Consider

Photo by Mockaroon on Unsplash

Photo by Mockaroon on Unsplash

Best time to travel Peru 

They dry season of May – October coincides with peak season when it’s more expensive and much more crowded but has drier (obviously) weather which also is important because sometimes in the mountains the snow can make it too dangerous to visit. 

Wet season is considered to be November- April. The advantages are the lower crowds and prices as well as beautiful lush greenery. The downsides are the rain, as well as making it a bit harder to spot wildlife in the Amazon and lots and lots of your friendly mosquitos. I was in Peru from November – mid January and besides the mosquitos never was only rained out in the Amazon for one activity. I enjoyed the flexibility of  being able to book things last minute and based on he crowds in some places don’t even want to begin to imagine what high season is life.  

The Inca trail is closed every February for maintenance so if you have your heart set on that trail don’t come during Feb. Machu Picchu is still in full swing and there are some other awesome alternative treks.   

United Nations on Unsplash

United Nations on Unsplash

Covid-19 Updates

July 20, 2020: Internal transportation has started with masks required on all public transit. Domestic flights are running at 30% capacity with strict protocols. Masks are obligatory as well as online check-in and only passengers are allowed in the airport. Arrive at least 3 hours early due to long lines. 

The re-opening of Machu Picchu has been pushed back from July 24. 

As of mid-May it was announced that international borders would potentially open in October.  

Jason Leung on Unsplash

Jason Leung on Unsplash

Money

Official currency: S/ Peruvian Sol

Budget:  Food, alcohol and accomodation aren’t particularly outrageous but you can expect activities and transportation to be your main costs.  Expect to pay anywhere from $1.50 – $3 USD for a beer , $10-$15 for dorm bed and usually start at $30 for budget hotels. Your treks and tours will vary depending on length. It’s important to shop around so you’re not being taken advantage of but remember that many times you get what you pay for and you probably don’t, in fact, want the cheapest tour. Ask what is offered, look at pictures and try to find reviews online as well as talking to someone in person if at all possible. 

Credit cards: The tourist trail is very well established throughout Peru and you won’t have issues using your card to pay for tours or accomodations  for a small surcharge.  Bars and restaurants will also take card but more local places its best to use cash. Additionally the surcharges on smaller purchases start to add up. 

Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Unsplash

Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Unsplash

Where to go 

Suggested itineraries for traveling Peru

ConvertKit on Unsplash

ConvertKit on Unsplash

Visas

97 visa exempt countries may come from 90 days to 183 depending on the nation.  This includes most of the Americas, Europe and Oceania, a handful of Asian countries and South Africa.  

**Always check with your government for the most up to date information on visa requirements.**

Sara Bakhshi Unsplash

Sara Bakhshi Unsplash

Vaccines

Yellow fever is recommended 

**Recommendations are given assuming you are up to date on routine vaccinations. Always check with your government for the most accurate and up to date information on required vaccinations for Peru travel specific to your country**

Anika Mikkelson on Unsplash

Anika Mikkelson on Unsplash

Safety 

Exercise Normal Precautions

**Always check with your government for the most accurate and up to date information on safety**

Tai's Captures on Unsplash

Tai's Captures on Unsplash

Responsible Tourism

Know before you go so you can be the most respectful and responsible visitor possible

Things to keep in mind when traveling Peru:

  • Porters: Many people who come to Peru go on a long trek or two. Porters do not always get paid as they should or have the best work environment. Make sure your trekking company has ethical policies and ensure your backpack is less than the max weight so the porters have room for their belongings. 
  • Be wary of any wildlife tourism (especially in the Amazon) shouldn’t allow interaction with animals 
  • Always shop and spend local when you can – from home stays to restaurants or markets and souvenirs 
travel peru - el pacas

Basic Info

Capital: Lima

Official Languages: Spanish, Quechua, Aymara

Plugs: Same the US and much of North America

A Closer Look